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010 – Cornell Thomas | A Positive Light

 

In this episode, I chat with author and motivational speaker Cornell Thomas about the power of positivity and creating his upcoming television show On Purpose, focused on helping people in need all over the world.

Follow Cornell! —> Instagram: @cornellthomas34 | Twitter: @CornellThomas | Facebook: bit.ly/2OWhYRN Web: bit.ly/2OXORO5

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009 – Ivy Box | The 365 Go Get H.E.R.S. Guide

In this episode, I chat with Ivy Box author of The 365 Go Get H.E.R.S. Guide and former cast member of BET’s College Hill Interns. Ivy shares business tips for women and men, and reveals what it’s like to be on a reality show.

Follow Ivy on Instagram and Twitter at @msivybox and visit her website at www.msivybox.com.

Follow WordyGirl Entertainment on Instagram and Twiter at @wordygirlent.  Visit our website at www.wordygirlent.com

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008 – Tracey Edmonds | Anatomy of Producing a Film

Check out my first one-on-one interview on the podcast! I chat with Television & Film Executive Producer Tracey Edmonds about the duties of a producer, her upcoming projects, and her advice to aspiring producers.

Follow Tracey on Instagram & Twitter at @traceyeedmonds and on her health, wellness & lifestyle website AlrightNow.com

Follow me on Instagram & Twitter at @wordygirlent and on my website at wordygirlent.com

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006 – Queen Sugar S3 E305 | A Little Lower Than Angels


In this episode, I recap and review Queen Sugar S3 E305 | A Little Lower Than Angels.

Check out my website at www.wordygirlent.com

Follow me on Instagram & Twitter at @wordygirlent

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005 – Ocean’s Eight

This week guest co-host, Lavetta Cannon joins me for a review of Ocean’s Eight starring Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett, Ann Hathaway, Mindy Kaling, Helena Bonham Carter, Sarah Paulson, Rihanna, and Akwafina. Check out Lavetta’s podcast Notorious Women at https://apple.co/2MUZtNJ Follow WordyGirl Entertainment on IG & Twitter: @wordygirlent Visit our website at https://bit.ly/2tyzP8u

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In My Write Mind | Kicking Worry’s Ass

98% of the time I don’t worry about things. Worry is such a useless, toxic emotion. When I catch myself drifting into that 2% area, I quickly mutter, “I ain’t gon’ worry about it.” And it works. Usually. If worry wins the battle, I surrender and let it run its course because clearly, there must be some kind of lesson I need to learn, right? Okay, bring it.

There’s only two things I worry about: my finances and my health. That’s when Worry sends her goons Hypocondria and Money Problems to do her dirty work.

Hypochondria sometimes gets the best of me. It’s triggered by a little ache or pain whereby I swear I have some fatal illness such as cancer or an autoimmune disease. The ache or pain usually goes away on its on in a couple of days or my doctor checks me out and says, “There’s nothing wrong with you.” Thanks doc, but don’t think I didn’t see that micro eye roll. I quickly forget all about my demise. Superwoman is back baby!

Now, Money Problems? That heffa doesn’t fight fair. One slip up and your ass is out on the street rubbing a growling stomach. Money Problems may have won battles in the past, but not this time. Listen, I’m about to let y’all all up in my business right now: I had a past due light bill and the services were scheduled for shut off the next day. Hey, times are tough these days. Anyway, I was worried because I didn’t have enough money to pay the bill in full. I asked someone if they could loan me the money, but they weren’t able to help me.

Money Problems had me pinned down and the countdown commenced. I went limp and accepted defeat. Being plunged into darkness wouldn’t be so bad would it? I mean, before the invention of electricity people got by just fine with candles. I could rough it. *Giving myself a serious side eye* Girl bye. You freaked out that time when the electricity went out for a day on account of the local power plant catching fire.

I got pissed and decided to fight back. I wasn’t about to let Worry and her thug Money Problems get the best of me. What could I do though? Maybe the power company would let me have an extension. But, they wouldn’t be open until the next day. That meant I would be Worry and Money Problems’ bitch for another day. Oh hell no! I refused to spend another minute messing around with those two. So, I logged into the power company’s website to see if I could request an extension immediately. Sure enough, I could.

Ha! In your face, Money Problems! I won the war. Now, throw me my damn parade.

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NaNoWriMo-ish

November 1st marks the start of NaNoWriMo.  For those who aren’t familiar, NaNoWriMo is short for National Novel Writing Month.  According to the NaNoWriMo website, it’s “a fun, seat-of-your-pants approach to creative writing.”  Participants have a 30 day deadline to write a 50,000 word novel.

I wanted to participate this year, but I don’t have the time because I’m currently working on a pilot script and, as of yesterday, a poetry book of haiku poems.  I want to have a draft of the script finished before the new year.  That’s right around the corner, so there’s no time for my damn procrastinating.

So, I figured I’ll join my fellow writers in spirit during NaNoWriMo by working on my projects everyday during the month of November.  Knowing there’s thousands of other writers writing their little hearts out will give me inspiration and energy to write everyday.

There’s a daily writing goal of 1,667 words.  However, if you don’t hit that goal, you can catch up the next day or whenever, but the point is to hit the daily mark so you don’t get behind.  I won’t be writing that many words a day.  My goal is simply to get SOMETHING written everyday.  I’ll be keeping track of my thoughts about the process daily in my journal dedicated to my writing projects and I’ll be giving weekly updates on my progress on this blog, so stay tuned!

Are you participating in NaNoWriMo this year?  What are you working on?

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A Gift Deferred

When I was a kid, I thought I would be a lawyer.  Not that I really knew what that meant at the time.  I was around five years old when some adult told me lawyers make a lot of money, so that’s what I should be.  That’s the worse thing that could have been said to me.  If only that person would have talked to me about following my passion…

As a kid, I had a natural attraction to words and stories.  I loved books and made good grades in English class without much effort.  My favorite school activities were book fairs and weekly trips to the library.  However, being a writer wasn’t something I thought about.

During my teenager years, I started writing short stories, poems and song lyrics, but it wasn’t until I was in my twenties when I started having a serious desire to be a writer.  I wanted to write novels like Zora Neale Hurston, Terri McMillian, and Jackie Collins.  Still, I did nothing about it. I continued to write short stories, poems, and song lyrics for my own pleasure, but I never really shared them with anybody; just a couple of friends.

It wasn’t until I had to declare a major in college when I finally knew that I wanted to be a professional writer.  It was an indirect decision though.  I was a music connoisseur and wanted to work in the music business as an Artist and Repertoire representative.  I know.  I was all over the place.  Anyway, at the time there was no such thing as majoring in the business side of music.  Schools only offered music degrees to musicians or people who wanted to teach music.  So, I picked the closest thing to the music business: Radio, Television and Film.

In one of the classes, we had to learn how to write television commercials.  I quickly got the hang of it.  That was all it took.  The screenwriting bug bit me.  I spent years learning the craft.  The journey has been long due to a nasty habit of procrastination, but I’m finally at the stage where I’m ready to cross into the professional arena.  I think I would have arrived at this stage when I was younger had I received encouragement as a child.  I’m not blaming anyone.  Back then, being a writer wasn’t thought of as a viable career.  Still, a little direction would have been golden.  Good thing it’s never too late to pursue your dreams.

The next time I find myself with the opportunity to encourage a young person about their future, I’ll make it a point to let them know it’s okay to go for the gold as long as it involves their passion.

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Cut To The F*cking Chase | How to Get Hollywood to Take Your Call

Someone called my office to submit a project.  I explained our script submission process to the caller and gave her my email address.  She sent a logline and synopsis five minutes later.  Cool beans, right?  That should have been the end of it, right?  Of course not.  That would be too much like right.  The caller called back to tell me that she already submitted a logline back in September of 2014.  Okay, my bad.  I didn’t get to it.  I let her know I wasn’t aware of her previous submission, but I’d be sure to take a look at what she just sent to me.  She reiterated the fact that she sent it back in September.  Um, was she looking for an apology?  Obviously, we didn’t get to it.

Maybe fifteen minutes later, another person called asking to submit a project.  I gave her the same instructions as the previous caller.  She informed me that she was at lunch at the moment and asked if I would mind texting her my email address.  Uh . . . YEAH I mind.

First of all, it is not the company’s job to put in work in order to read your stuff.  Secondly, as if I want some stranger having my cell phone number!  Her request was very unprofessional.  Why couldn’t she wait until she was in a proper setting where she could break out pen and paper to take dictation of my email address?  Was she under some kind of duress to call that very minute?  Like, did somebody have a gun to her head?  She easily could have waited to make the call at a time when she was better prepared.  It would have saved her from looking unprofessional and amateurish.

Most people in Hollywood wouldn’t have put up with that kind of foolishness.  They would have told her to call back when she had her shit together.  I tend to be on the nicer side of the fence.  I was kind enough to ask for her email address so that I could shoot her an email, then she would be able to get my email address that way.  I wrote down her email address with the intention to email her.  Eventually.  The manner in which she approached the company didn’t incite me to email her quick, fast, and in a hurry.  I would have gotten around to it.  Eventually.  Lucky for her, she called back later that day to get my email address.

I warn you, don’t conduct yourself like these callers.  You will annoy the hell out of us and land yourself on the “Do Not Read” list.

Here’s how to get Hollywood to take your phone call:

  1. BE CONFIDENT

Don’t call there stuttering and “um-ing” all over the place.  Speak in a calm, self-assured manner.  Know what the hell you’re talking about or earn an Oscar pretending like you do.  If you’re told to submit a logline and you don’t know what a logline is, don’t be all, “What’s a logline?” That’s a red flag.  The person on the other end of the phone line is thinking, if you don’t know what a logline is, chances are you don’t have a grasp on screenwriting yet.  That won’t make them eager to read your script.  Google is your friend.  Use it.

  1. BE PROFESSIONAL

Scene for Blog Post

So, that happened.  Like, in real life.  Minus the atom splitting request.  But, yeah.  Really, dude?  A ‘lil sumthin’ sumthin’?  And what would that be?  Have a purpose when calling.  Are you calling to find out about the submission process?  Are you calling to get an email address?  If so, have a pen and paper ready to write down information.  Make sure you’re in a quiet environment.  Nobody wants to hear your loud television or barking dogs in the background.

  1. BE PATIENT

Don’t call with an attitude because the company hasn’t gotten back to you about the script you sent months ago.  In this business, it’s normal not to get a response from a production company, agency or studio.  The correct thing to do is to follow up with the company after a reasonable amount of time.  The turnaround time is usually around six to eight weeks, but it varies with each company.   If the company has more submissions than they can handle, the wait time can be even longer.  At the end of the eight weeks (or whatever they tell you), feel free to follow up. If they still haven’t read your submission, don’t get an attitude.  That will only get you put on the dreaded “Do Not Read” list.

Wait about a month to follow up again.  That’s a good amount of time that keeps you from being annoying.  If they still haven’t read your script, don’t take it personally.  They aren’t ignoring you.  They have piles upon piles of scripts waiting to be read.  Chances are they don’t have a large enough staff to read the scripts in a timely manner.  If they tell you they’re going to read your stuff, they will.  Eventually.  Be patient.  Don’t be an angry stalker.  It’s not a good look.

So, that’s the trick.  Act like you have good sense when calling Hollywood and they’ll take your call and read your stuff.  Eventually.  LOL 😉