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008 – Tracey Edmonds | Anatomy of Producing a Film

Check out my first one-on-one interview on the podcast! I chat with Television & Film Executive Producer Tracey Edmonds about the duties of a producer, her upcoming projects, and her advice to aspiring producers.

Follow Tracey on Instagram & Twitter at @traceyeedmonds and on her health, wellness & lifestyle website AlrightNow.com

Follow me on Instagram & Twitter at @wordygirlent and on my website at wordygirlent.com

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007 – Queen Sugar S3 E306 | Delicate and Strangely Made

In this episode, I recap and review Queen Sugar S3 E306 | Delicate and Strangely Made. Follow me on Instagram and Twitter: @wordygirlent Check out my blog at https://bit.ly/2tyzP8u

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006 – Queen Sugar S3 E305 | A Little Lower Than Angels


In this episode, I recap and review Queen Sugar S3 E305 | A Little Lower Than Angels.

Check out my website at www.wordygirlent.com

Follow me on Instagram & Twitter at @wordygirlent

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005 – Ocean’s Eight

This week guest co-host, Lavetta Cannon joins me for a review of Ocean’s Eight starring Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett, Ann Hathaway, Mindy Kaling, Helena Bonham Carter, Sarah Paulson, Rihanna, and Akwafina. Check out Lavetta’s podcast Notorious Women at https://apple.co/2MUZtNJ Follow WordyGirl Entertainment on IG & Twitter: @wordygirlent Visit our website at https://bit.ly/2tyzP8u

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In My Write Mind | Kicking Worry’s Ass

98% of the time I don’t worry about things. Worry is such a useless, toxic emotion. When I catch myself drifting into that 2% area, I quickly mutter, “I ain’t gon’ worry about it.” And it works. Usually. If worry wins the battle, I surrender and let it run its course because clearly, there must be some kind of lesson I need to learn, right? Okay, bring it.

There’s only two things I worry about: my finances and my health. That’s when Worry sends her goons Hypocondria and Money Problems to do her dirty work.

Hypochondria sometimes gets the best of me. It’s triggered by a little ache or pain whereby I swear I have some fatal illness such as cancer or an autoimmune disease. The ache or pain usually goes away on its on in a couple of days or my doctor checks me out and says, “There’s nothing wrong with you.” Thanks doc, but don’t think I didn’t see that micro eye roll. I quickly forget all about my demise. Superwoman is back baby!

Now, Money Problems? That heffa doesn’t fight fair. One slip up and your ass is out on the street rubbing a growling stomach. Money Problems may have won battles in the past, but not this time. Listen, I’m about to let y’all all up in my business right now: I had a past due light bill and the services were scheduled for shut off the next day. Hey, times are tough these days. Anyway, I was worried because I didn’t have enough money to pay the bill in full. I asked someone if they could loan me the money, but they weren’t able to help me.

Money Problems had me pinned down and the countdown commenced. I went limp and accepted defeat. Being plunged into darkness wouldn’t be so bad would it? I mean, before the invention of electricity people got by just fine with candles. I could rough it. *Giving myself a serious side eye* Girl bye. You freaked out that time when the electricity went out for a day on account of the local power plant catching fire.

I got pissed and decided to fight back. I wasn’t about to let Worry and her thug Money Problems get the best of me. What could I do though? Maybe the power company would let me have an extension. But, they wouldn’t be open until the next day. That meant I would be Worry and Money Problems’ bitch for another day. Oh hell no! I refused to spend another minute messing around with those two. So, I logged into the power company’s website to see if I could request an extension immediately. Sure enough, I could.

Ha! In your face, Money Problems! I won the war. Now, throw me my damn parade.

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A Gift Deferred

When I was a kid, I thought I would be a lawyer.  Not that I really knew what that meant at the time.  I was around five years old when some adult told me lawyers make a lot of money, so that’s what I should be.  That’s the worse thing that could have been said to me.  If only that person would have talked to me about following my passion…

As a kid, I had a natural attraction to words and stories.  I loved books and made good grades in English class without much effort.  My favorite school activities were book fairs and weekly trips to the library.  However, being a writer wasn’t something I thought about.

During my teenager years, I started writing short stories, poems and song lyrics, but it wasn’t until I was in my twenties when I started having a serious desire to be a writer.  I wanted to write novels like Zora Neale Hurston, Terri McMillian, and Jackie Collins.  Still, I did nothing about it. I continued to write short stories, poems, and song lyrics for my own pleasure, but I never really shared them with anybody; just a couple of friends.

It wasn’t until I had to declare a major in college when I finally knew that I wanted to be a professional writer.  It was an indirect decision though.  I was a music connoisseur and wanted to work in the music business as an Artist and Repertoire representative.  I know.  I was all over the place.  Anyway, at the time there was no such thing as majoring in the business side of music.  Schools only offered music degrees to musicians or people who wanted to teach music.  So, I picked the closest thing to the music business: Radio, Television and Film.

In one of the classes, we had to learn how to write television commercials.  I quickly got the hang of it.  That was all it took.  The screenwriting bug bit me.  I spent years learning the craft.  The journey has been long due to a nasty habit of procrastination, but I’m finally at the stage where I’m ready to cross into the professional arena.  I think I would have arrived at this stage when I was younger had I received encouragement as a child.  I’m not blaming anyone.  Back then, being a writer wasn’t thought of as a viable career.  Still, a little direction would have been golden.  Good thing it’s never too late to pursue your dreams.

The next time I find myself with the opportunity to encourage a young person about their future, I’ll make it a point to let them know it’s okay to go for the gold as long as it involves their passion.

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Cut To The F*cking Chase | How to Get Hollywood to Read Your Script

. . . ACTION!

Okay, so you finally grew the balls to call a production company to ask if you can send them your script.  Good for you!  Now, here’s how not to eff it up.  Find out their submission policy and . . . DO. WHAT. THEY. TELL. YOU. TO. DO.  If they tell you to submit a logline, then send them a logline ONLY.  Don’t throw in your script, cast wish list (you’re not the decider here), budget, and soundtrack suggestions (nobody cares about soundtracks anymore) all packaged in a pretty blue presentation folder that you eagerly bounced down to Staples to pick out thinking it would make the production company buy your script.  No.  It will not.

Different production companies have different policies.  One may want a logline, another may want a synopsis.  You may even stumble upon that rare unicorn of a production company that will allow you to submit your script without having an agent.  Whatever their submission policy is, adhere to it.  Why?  Because they have their particular policies for a reason.  For example, one company may only want a logline because they receive tons of submissions and don’t have time (maybe due to lack of manpower) to read a bunch of full-length scripts.

A logline saves the reader a lot of time.  It immediately tells the reader what the story and character are about.  It also lets the reader know if the writer has any skills.  If your logline sucks hard, there’s a 99% chance that your whole script sucks even harder because if you haven’t mastered how to write a logline, you haven’t mastered how to crank out 100 pages that somebody other than your mommy would want to read.  Production companies ain’t got time for that!

Just work on your logline.  Make it sing and then send it in, but follow the rules and save your little presentation folder for school or something.  You will only piss off the reader on account of her having to shuffle through all of that extra crap.  And when you piss off a reader, your script goes in the trash and you get placed on the “do not read anything from this person EVER” list.  It’s basically like an airline “no fly” list minus the terrorist.  In other words, you’re screwed.  Yes, the punishment seems petty and mean, but it is what it is.  “Life is pain.  You just get used to it” (Charly Baltimore, The Long Kiss Goodnight).

. . . CUT!

Tell me, have you ever submitted something to a production company, agent or studio?  What happened?  Spill the tea in the comments section.